Preparing to Preach: Prayer

Have you prayed today?

Engage the Pews

Prayer is one of the most important and most neglected steps in preparing to preach.  These days, the church is all about the latest method, statistics and even gimmicks.  Prayer however is not any of these.  Instead, prayer, simply put, is just communication with God.  Somehow it can get lost in the pastoral habit due to the demand put on the preacher.  Nevertheless, prayer needs to take some priority on top of sound preparation.  If you don’t even talk to the God whom you worship, how can you talk about God?

Prayer can be divided into two general categories: person and pastoral.

Personal prayer comes from our daily living. It’s no different than us talking to our spouses, children or friends, except in this case, we’re talking to God.  This can happen as a disciplined form of daily worship or can happen as part of what we do going about…

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Published by Earl J. Griffin, Sr.

As a John Maxwell Certified Coach, Teacher and Speaker, I can offer you workshops, seminars, keynote speaking, and coaching, aiding your personal and professional growth through study and practical application of John’s proven leadership methods. For over 40 years, my tract record as a proven leader has been exemplary both in the United States Army and as a Pastor in the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. As a John Maxwell Certified Coach, Mentor, and Speaker, I use this expertise and experience to help leaders grow to their full potential. Coupled with my John Maxwell Certification is my Master of Science degree in Leadership Development, from Walden University. I am uniquely skilled at helping corporate leaders in the areas of human resources development programs, middle and executive leader development programs, and mentoring practices within the workplace. Both my professional time as an Organizational Development Specialist within the United States Army and my tenure as Senior Pastor within my church help me assist leaders in resolving the ethical dilemmas of leadership and developing the cultural skills necessary to lead in diverse multi-cultural organizations. Let's develop a sustainable relationship that benefits both your organization and that helps you achieve your personal leadership goals.

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