Tag Archives: life

Hope Is….

Hope Is the Belief That Anything Is Possible!

Put yourself in Mary’s shoes for a minute. You’re in your room late at night when an angel appears out of nowhere and tells you you’re going to get pregnant (without having sex) and that your son will reign like a king.

To say this is hard to believe would be an understatement. But after receiving this mind-blowing news, Mary does not question God’s fulfillment of His promises. Her only question is a practical one: “How will this be…since I am a virgin?” (Luke 1:34). Instead of getting caught up in questions like “Why me?” or “Are you sure?”, Mary’s response is, “OK. How’s this going to work?”

In this moment, Mary shows us what it means to live in hope. Living in hope is realizing that nothing is impossible with God. The same God who made a way for a virgin to give birth wants to do the impossible in our lives today. The wayward child who leaves you sleepless night after night is within God’s reach. The cancer that threatens a loved one’s life is not beyond God’s ability to heal.

Living in hope, Mary believed God and pursued the sign He gave her. For us, living in hope looks exactly the same—believing that nothing is impossible with God and doing what God has put on our hearts to do. We may not know how all the details will work out, but God always does what He says He’ll do.

Pray:

Jesus, give me the faith to believe that nothing is impossible and the courage to face what’s before me today. Even though I may not understand how this will all come together, I put my hope in You.

Reflect:

Is there a longing God placed on your heart that seems impossible to fulfill? How can you take a step today to put action to your faith?

(From Bible App Reading Plan “Hope Is”)

The Courage to “Be”

“Whosoever shall find his life shall lose it; whosoever shall lose his life for my sake shall find it.” (Matthew 10:39)

Introduction
Since the dawn of time mankind has struggled to find meaning in life. Jesus posits a challenge in our text this morning. Jesus challenges us to find not only the true meaning for life; but also challenges us to dedicate the life we find to him for his purposes.

Who am I? Where am I? Am I awake or asleep? Alive or dead? How did I get here? What am I supposed to do while I’m here? Is there life after death? Why is there death?

The Movie, “The Matrix” sought to answer these questions. In this movie the world we know as reality is depicted as some form of pseudo-reality. It was a sham, a hoax, perpetrated by those who sought to enslave humanity through use of its vices and weaknesses. The real world in “the Matrix” was the machine world; a world of reality confined to numbers and cold, unemotional purpose. If you had a purpose you were allowed to serve the Architect of this pseudo reality otherwise you were terminated.

The key was to have your mind expiated from this pseudo reality by Morpheus and to be reborn as a cross between human and machine. Once freed your powers were increased and you could fight the machine world to regain and protect the pseudo reality which you despised in the first place. Zion as it were was the city of bliss and happiness that all humans coveted; it had to be protected at all costs. Zion was the aim and object of those seeking to be freed. It was a very intriguing movie but left us just as confused as we were before its production. For you see trying to answer life’s questions apart from Jesus is futile, frustrating, and fruitless.

Jesus uproots us from this pseudo reality and transports us into a new reality, the reality of God’s Kingdom. We can choose to spend our life trying to discover what and who we are in this world or we can spend our time discovering what and who we are in the Kingdom. In the former choice, we find a never ending story; but in the latter decision we find absolute power, purpose, and passion for living. In other words we can spend our time finding out who and what we are only to keep discovering that we can’t fully discover it or we can find and discover who we are based on our relationship with Jesus Christ.

Let us explore these two choices, seeking to find out about ourselves in this world or seeking to find out about our relationship to God in this world.
These two choices are reflected in the words of this text: “Whosoever shall find his life shall lose it; whosoever shall lose his life for my sake shall find it.” This is a strange and mind boggling text. It seems to suggest two pathways; one that leads to death and one that leads to life. In other words, even after we spend a lifetime looking for the answers to the quintessential questions “Who Am I?” “Why Am I Here?” outlined before, even after we find the answers, we will still end up losing our life.

So, should we spend our time looking for our life knowing that we will lose it anyway? Or should we decide how we will live our lives in this world?

Move 2
Now consider this: We are persons! “A person is one who knows the world around him and particularly who knows himself in relation to that world and to other persons. . . . A person may be influenced from without, but the determining factor in shaping life and destiny is from within. Others may influence us; we determine ourselves. This means that a person has the power of looking ahead and of choosing one’s own course in light of moral distinctive.

Thus the challenge that Jesus poses is a challenge that can literally be accepted. This challenge is to “be or to become.” It is to find out who and what you really are and to “be” that unique distinct person, and then surrender that person to him and his cause. It is what Paul Tillich in his novel work The Courage to Be puts this spin on the text:. ” … Therefore, Jesus says that we are to take accept the life we find or determine within ourselves to use that life for his purpose, power, and passion. That passion is to help others discover their true selves and then commit that self to God through a personal relationship with Jesus as a disciple. Since loss of life is inevitable, Jesus challenges us to lose it doing the will of God rather than our own. But who can make such decision without first discovering who they are and “being” who they are in relation to this world? None of us can truly decide to become disciples of Jesus until we first discover who we are without Jesus. From such thinking is derived the saying of Shakespeare, “To Thine Own Self Be True.”

There are obstacles to determining who and what we are. They are three: intimidation, domination, and manipulation. Each derive from our relationship with others. Your environment influences your choices; intimidation, domination, and manipulation negatively influence you becoming your true self. All three of these obstacles are the forces of darkness that seek to cut you off from the light which shines once you obtain wisdom and knowledge about yourself. Only after overcoming these three negative influences can we discover our true self and with that the “life” of which Jesus speaks.

Move 3
Many of us quite frankly are hypocrites. We pretend to be who we are not. We have lived in response to intimidation, domination, and manipulation. We have kept our true self hidden, protected from the world or those in our environment. Only when we develop the courage to be can we relinquish that true self to Jesus in discipleship. Living as someone you’re not keeps you chained, isolated, imprisoned.

Only when you decide to “be” can you realize the depths of your alienation from God and accept God’s Son, Jesus as Savior. This notion of being is as a homosexual coming out of the closet. It is as an alcoholic refusing to drink another alcoholic beverage. It is as you and I determining to speak our truth refusing to allow others to intimidate, dominate, or manipulate us.

Being you is tough. Being you means accepting who you are at the core of your being: the good, the bad, the ugly. People in the world often exclaim, “Don’t judge me!” “Accept me for who I am.” “What you see is what you get!” Then, go on to be who they think someone else wants them to be. Being you is tough; accepting you is even more difficult.

Yet, this is exactly the you Jesus is challenging you to be. He does so because this is the you God is after. David, the King of Israel gave God his true self: whoremonger, murderer, selfish,warrior, betrayer, lover, friend, leader, servant, shepherd, singer, song writer, worshipper. David was all these things; but David dedicated his total nature, his true self, to God. And God accepted David as a son. David the Bible commends David on this one point, “David was a man after God’s own heart.” David sought to become who God intended him to be even as David dealt with his own true self.

This is discipleship: surrendering your true nature to Jesus and exchanging that nature for Christ’s nature. It is an evolving, transformative relationship with Jesus Christ. This, my friends, is the courage to be. Jesus invites us to trust Him with our true selves knowing that Jesus has paid the price and knows the way for us to live free eternally. I urge you to submit your true nature to Jesus today! Amen.

The Courage to Be

“Whosoever shall find his life shall lose it; whosoever shall lose his life for my sake shall find it.” (Matthew 10 : 39)

Introduction 
Since the dawn of time mankind has struggled to find meaning in life.   Jesus posits a challenge in our text this morning. 

Jesus challenges us to find not only the true meaning for life; but also challenges us to dedicate the life we find to him for his purposes. 
Who am I?  Where am I?  Am I awake or asleep?  Alive or dead?  How did I get here?  What am I supposed to do while I’m here?  Is there life after death?  Why is there death? 
         

The Movie, “The Matrix” sought to answer these questions.  In this movie the world we know as reality is depicted as some form of pseudo-reality.  It was a sham, a hoax, perpetrated by those who sought to enslave humanity through use of its vices and weaknesses.  The real world in “the Matrix” was the machine world; a world of reality confined to numbers and cold, unemotional purpose.  If you had a purpose you were allowed to serve the Architect of this pseudo reality otherwise you were terminated. 
         

The key was to have your mind expiated from this pseudo reality by Morpheus and to be reborn as a cross between human and machine.  Once freed your powers were increased and you could fight the machine world to regain and protect the pseudo reality which you despised in the first place.  Zion as it were was the city of bliss and happiness that all humans coveted; it had to be protected at all costs.  Zion was the aim and object of those seeking to be freed.  It was a very intriguing movie but left us just as confused as we were before its production.  For you see trying to answer life’s questions apart from Jesus is futile, frustrating, and fruitless.
         

Jesus uproots us from this pseudo reality and transports us into a new reality, the reality of God’s Kingdom. We can choose to spend our life trying to discover what and who we are in this world or we can spend our time discovering what and who we are in the Kingdom.  In the former choice, we find a never ending story; but in the latter decision we find absolute power, purpose, and passion for living.  In other words we can spend our time finding out who and what we are only to keep discovering that we can’t fully discover it or we can find and discover who we are based on our relationship with Jesus Christ.

Let us explore these two choices, seeking to find out about ourselves in this world or seeking to find out about our relationship to God in this world. 

These two choices are reflected in the words of this text:  “Whosoever shall find his life shall lose it; whosoever shall lose his life for my sake shall find it.”  This is a strange and mind boggling text.  It seems to suggest two pathways; one that leads to death and one that leads to life after death. 

In other words, even after we spend a lifetime looking for the answers to the quintessential questions “Who Am I?” “Why Am I Here?” outlined before, even after we find the answers, we will still end up losing our life. 

So, should we spend our time looking for our life knowing that we will lose it anyway?  Or should we decide how we will live our lives in this world?

Move 2
Now consider this:  We are persons!  “A person is one who knows the world around him and particularly who knows himself in relation to that world and to other persons. . . . A person may be influenced from without, but the determining factor in shaping life and destiny is from within.  Others may influence us; we determine ourselves.  This means that a person has the power of looking ahead and of choosing one’s own course in light of moral distinctive. 

Thus the challenge that Jesus poses is a challenge that can literally be accepted.  This challenge is to “be or to become.”  It is to find out who and what you really are and to “be” that unique distinct person, and then surrender that person to him and his cause.  It is what Paul Tillich in his novel work The Courage to Be puts this spin on the text:. ” …  Therefore, Jesus says that we are to take accept the life we find or determine within ourselves to use that life for his purpose, power, and passion.  That passion is to help others discover their true selves and then commit that self to God through a personal relationship with Jesus as a disciple.  Since loss of life is inevitable, Jesus challenges us to lose it doing the will of God rather than our own.  But who can make such decision without first discovering who they are and “being” who they are in relation to this world?  None of us can truly decide to become disciples of Jesus until we first discover who we are without Jesus.  From such thinking is derived the saying of Shakespeare, “To Thine Own Self Be True.”  

There are obstacles to determining who and what we are.  They are three:  intimidation, domination, and manipulation.  Each derive from our relationship with others.  Your environment influences your choices; intimidation, domination, and manipulation negatively influence you becoming your true self.  All three of these obstacles are the forces of darkness that seek to cut you off from the light which shines once you obtain wisdom and knowledge about yourself.  Only after overcoming these three negative influences can we discover our true self and with that the “life” of which Jesus speaks.

Move 3
          Many of us quite frankly are hypocrites.  We pretend to be who we are not.  We have lived in response to intimidation, domination, and manipulation.  We have kept our true self hidden, protected from the world or those in our environment. 

Only when we develop the courage to be can we relinquish that true self to Jesus in discipleship.  Living as someone you’re not keeps you chained, isolated, imprisoned. 
         

Only when you decide to “be” can you realize the depths of your alienation from God and accept God’s Son, Jesus as Savior.

This notion of being is as a homosexual coming out of the closet.  It is as an alcoholic refusing to drink another alcoholic beverage.  It is as you and I determining to speak our truth refusing to allow others to intimidate, dominate, or manipulate us. 
         

Being you is tough.  Being you means accepting who you are at the core of your being: the good, the bad, the ugly.  People in the world often exclaim, “Don’t judge me!” “Accept me for who I am.” “What you see is what you get!” Then, go on to be who they think someone else wants them to be.  Being you is tough; accepting you is even more difficult.
          Yet, this is exactly the you Jesus is challenging you to be. 

He does so because this is the you God is after.  David, the King of Israel gave God his true self: whoremonger, murderer, selfish,warrior, betrayer, lover, friend, leader, servant, shepherd, singer, song writer, worshipper.  David was all these things; but David dedicated his total nature, his true self, to God.  And God accepted David as a son. David the Bible commends David on this one point, “David was a man after God’s own heart.” David sought to become who God intended him to be even as David dealt with his own true self.
         

This is discipleship: surrendering your true nature to Jesus and exchanging that nature for Christ’s nature.  It is an evolving, transformative relationship with Jesus Christ. 

This, my friends, is the courage to be.  Jesus invites us to trust Him with our true selves knowing that Jesus has paid the price and knows the way for us to live free eternally.  I urge you to submit your true nature to Jesus today! Amen.

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Confrontation

Life refuses to bend
My dreams refuse to die
Accept life’s terms
Or walk away…

Decisions amid uncertainties
Bend life bend
Give a little; negotiate in good faith
I’m willing to compromise….

Life refuses to bend
My dreams refuse to die
Accept life’s terms
Or walk away…

So much at stake
Faith, Family, Friends…
Can you do it afraid
Accept life’s terms
Or walk away..

My dreams refuse to die,
My dreams refuse to die.

Rethinking Crime and Violence..

“A slacker’s craving will kill him because his hands refuse to work. He is filled with craving  all day long, but the righteous give and don’t hold back.” (Proverbs 21:25-26)

The slacker does not die alone.  When the righteous withholds charity from the slacker,  crime and violence are the results.  Poverty left to its own devices tends toward theft and murder. Judging the slacker rather than blessing the slacker or the slackers’ progeny, creates civil unrest.

The righteous understands his or her responsibility to maintain a decent and orderly society despite the presence of slackers.  Selah.

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Aborted Dreams

 

Dreams shattered by inactivity

they were meant to be mine

meant to bless me

aborted dreams.

 

Dreams, not yet ready to give birth

timing was all wrong, went to the clinic

dreams shattered in one instant

aborted dreams.

 

Dreams fueled by purpose

planned, examined, and broadcast

nevertheless, distracted, discouraged, detoured.

aborted dreams.

 

Predetermined, Preordained, Predestined

but my choices

Fun, leisure, undisciplined behavior

aborted dreams.

 

Written in the book

Joy, Prosperity, Peace, Success

left unattended, left on the pages

aborted dreams.

Making Decisions Prematurely

You saw me before I was born. Every day of my life was recorded in your book. Every moment was laid out before a single day had passed. How precious are your thoughts about me, O God. They cannot be numbered! (Psalms 139:16-17, NLT)

I’m still living from the book written about me before I was born.  I’m in Chapter 58. There are many things happening in this chapter of my life. Equally so are the decisions that I’m compelled to make. Each decision will change me in some way; they are unsettling. 

I have wrestled three nights in my sleep.  Tonight I fought myself disguised as my son who drowned and my brother who drowned.  Both of these incidents crippled me. I made a decision,  a subconscious decision to defy life, to rebel against being successful twice.  So I would always do something to sabotage my success.  That was a Book Decision based on Chapters 16 and 43 in my life.  That was a mistake!

Each time it appeared that I had successfully derailed my success,  God intervened with more grace and mercy.  God determined my traumatic, and crippling experiences would not cancel the blessings God had prepared for me. God determined I would live, love, and laugh again.  In Chapter 58,  God keeps knocking my socks off! 

I’ve learned not to make Book Decisions based on the Chapter I’m living now.