Tag Archives: reconciliation

Faith to Forgive

Text:  Luke 17:5-6

5The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!”  6He replied, “If you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it will obey you.

Introduction

The disciples when confronted with the necessity to forgive in a way that would transform their lives, said to Jesus, “Lord, Increase our faith.”  When God challenges us to do a new thing we often find ourselves believing that the faith we have is incapable of achieving the goals God has set for us.  Nonetheless, God continuously challenges us to reach higher, dig deeper, and go further than we think we can.  It would be unfair of God to ask, if God did not know that we could achieve what God calls us to do. [Let me interject right here that when God asks you to accomplish a goal, he has already calculated his involvement in its completion.]  Lord, have mercy!

Mustard seeds are the small round seeds of various mustard plants. The seeds are typically about 1 or 2 mm in diameter, larger than many plants such as poppy, columbine, potulaca and dandelion while relatively small compared to many others such as pumpkin, watermelon, apples, pine-cone or coconuts. Mustard seeds may be colored from yellowish white to black.

Mulberry trees are famous fruit treats tracing back to ancient civilizations.     The most impressive aspect of the mulberry tree is that is can grow up to ten feet each year.   White mulberries can reach 80 feet, and can also be pyramidal or weeping in form. Red mulberry trees may reach up to 70 feet. The black mulberry is much shorter, reaching only 30 feet, and unless trained tends to grow as a multi-stemmed shrub. The three species differ greatly in longevity.  It is unusual for a red mulberry tree to survive more than 75 years, while a black mulberry may produce fruit for hundreds of years.  In other words, a mulberry tree has deep roots and is not easily moved by humans or destroyed by disaster.

When outwardly compared to a mustard seed, the mulberry tree is much more formidable and awe inspiring.  The mulberry tree relies on its vast network of roots for survival whereas the mustard seed relies on God’s grace to grow.  One is not germinated while the other is fully grown and producing fruit.

Jesus insists that “If you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it will obey you.”  What an awesome depiction of faith.  If you start where you are, doing the will of God, before you know it, the faith you have will develop in such a way that you will be able to do things you thought impossible.  Jesus says develop your faith by using your faith.  You don’t get more faith by asking; you get more faith by doing.  Lord, have mercy!

 

Move 1

One day the great Michelangelo attracted a crowd of spectators as he worked. One child in particular was fascinated by the sight of chips flying and the sound of mallet on chisel. The master was shaping a large block of white marble. Unable to contain her curiosity, the little girl inquired, “What are you making?” He replied, “There is an angel in there and I must set it free.”
Every Christian begins his/her relationship with Christ with a measure of faith.  This passage introduces us to a clear path to setting this measure of faith free. The faith God put in you is enough for you to enjoy all that God has in store for your life.  Faith does not move your mountains, the God behind your faith moves the mountains.  Faith does not set you free; the God behind your faith sets you free!

 

Move 2

Jesus outlined three simple ways to release your faith. Three small steps to develop your faith.

First, forgiving those who repent.  Christians live knowing that people will offend us.  It is inevitable that somebody is going to offend you.  Saints, you do not prepare to retaliate, Jesus says you prepare to forgive.  Only through forgiveness can those who offend us receive God’s grace.  Jesus says in Luke 17:3-4, “3Take heed to yourselves: If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him.  4And if he trespass against thee seven times in a day, and seven times in a day turn again to thee, saying, I repent; thou shalt forgive him.”

 

Dr. F.B. Meyer tells of a meeting of a church which was seeking a revival. During the meeting an elder got up and said to the minister, “I don’t think there is going to be a revival here as long as Brother Jones and I don’t speak to each other.” He went across to Jones and said, “Brother, you and I haven’t spoken to each other in five years. Let’s bury the hatchet. Here’s my hand.” Shortly afterwards another elder got up and said, “Minister, I think there will be no revival here while I say nice things about you to your face and am disloyal to you behind your back. I want you to forgive me.” Soon others were on their feet settling old scores. Then says Meyer, God began to visit them. The meeting was crowded and a revival broke out that swept over the whole district.  There was time for confession and an offer of forgiveness and healing. There could be no forgiveness without repentance and confession; no healing without recognizing the disease.

 

Second, believing God can change those who repent.  Faith is acting on what we believe about God.  Jesus does not ask us to look to our faith to forgive others.  Jesus reminds us that how big or small our faith is does not determine the outcome.  God is able to take those whose offense was huge and transform that person into a servant of his.  God has a way of turning people around when you do what he commands you to do.  In other words, God develops your faith as you exercise your faith.

 

In Luke 17:5-6 the disciples look at their limitations rather than God’s abilities.  It reads, “5And the apostles said unto the Lord, Increase our faith.  6And the Lord said, If ye had faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye might say unto this sycamine tree, Be thou plucked up by the root, and be thou planted in the sea; and it should obey you.”

 

We have to believe in God’s ability to respond to the faith he has given us and act on that faith.  Years ago, two young men with a long history of delinquency and crime robbed a YMCA on the lower east side of Manhattan. On their way out of the building, they saw a young man at a telephone switchboard. They were frightened and assumed that he was calling the police. They seized him and beat him savagely with brass knuckles and a black jack. Thinking him to be dead, they hid him behind a radiator near the swimming pool and escaped.

 

Later that evening Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel, was walking by the pool. She slipped in the young man’s blood, screamed and then found Donald Tippet’s body. He was rushed to the hospital where he lingered for days between life and death. Eventually he lived but one eye was so badly damaged it could not be saved.

 

Meanwhile the two young men were apprehended and brought to trial. Their past records assured that they would both get long sentences. However Donald Tippet did an amazing thing. He requested that the judge allow the two young men to be paroled to his charge. He wanted to give the boys a chance to change.

 

One of the boys blew his opportunity. He committed another crime, was caught and sent to jail. The other boy, however, was responsive to Tippet’s kindness. He went to college and eventually to medical school. He became one of our nation’s leading surgeons – an eye surgeon.

When Everett Palmer wrote of Donald Tippet’s amazing story of forgiveness and this surgeon’s accomplishments, he added, “I wonder if he ever performed one of those delicate eye operations without thinking of that night in the YMCA.”

 

Third and finally, Seeing forgiveness as our Christian duty.  Listen to verses 7-10 again.  “7But which of you, having a servant plowing or feeding cattle, will say unto him by and by, when he is come from the field, Go and sit down to meat?  8And will not rather say unto him, Make ready wherewith I may sup, and gird thyself, and serve me, till I have eaten and drunken; and afterward thou shalt eat and drink?  9Doth he thank that servant because he did the things that were commanded him? I trow not.  10So likewise ye, when ye shall have done all those things which are commanded you, say, We are unprofitable servants: we have done that which was our duty to do.”

 

This parable gives us two types of responses to offense. The first one appears when the disciples come to Jesus and ask him to increase their faith. They give evidence of a church that believes it is their faith that makes the difference in someone’s life. They value church membership and fellowship more than evangelism and outreach.  This church is a little bit like the tavern called “Cheers” where everybody’s knows your name, and everybody’s glad you came, and everyone’s problems are all the same.

 

And this church likes it that way! There is a sense of community, a sense of belonging and caring, and we value it deeply. The prayer in this church is “God, give us greater faith, and greater blessings, and greater fellowship with our friends.”  But God don’t ask us to forgive others as you have forgiven us!  Don’t move us out of our comfort zone.  If you want us to do this, God you have to provide us something that we don’t have because we’re not prepared to do this.  Lord, have mercy!

 

The second response is dutiful forgiveness.  What Jesus tells the disciples is that forgiveness is hard work.  He uses the imagery of a slave serving his master. The servant has no right to demand anything of the master nor to expect to do anything but serve the master.

 

It’s not a comfortable image for Christian people, and perhaps that’s why this is not one of our most loved parables. We don’t like to think of ourselves as “worthless slaves;” we prefer to see ourselves as “special lambs.” But we cannot ignore the obvious expectation of Jesus in this parable; Jesus calls Christians to pack a lunch pail, put on a hardhat, and spend themselves by serving others.

 

Not just exhaust themselves in service, but do so without any recognition.  It is amazing that in the church today, people have to be recognized in order to serve the Lord.  Either pay me, applaud me, give me an award, or make me important.  Servant leadership has taken a back seat to selfless service.

 

Jesus admonishes us not to look for better treatment from those we forgive, nor to look for God to shout our names from his throne.  Jesus admonishes us to consider the act of forgiveness routine and to do so habitually simply because of what God has done for us.  How many do you know that want forgive someone unless that person caters to their every whim or demand?  How many people do you know that put requirements on their forgiveness?

 

Conclusion

I’m glad that God says if you forgive, I can use you to move mountains in people’s lives.  People want somebody to forgive them and to understand them.  People want someone who will offer them the unconditional love of God.  People have made so many mistakes, done so many wrong things in their lives, that when they come to church, they need somebody who will forgive them and offer them God’s grace and mercy to start again.

 

God wants somebody who will forgive the person who offends them.  God wants somebody who will allow him to change that person, and God wants somebody who will do so without any thought to compensation or reward.  Forgiveness given in this fashion can be the one avenue that God can use to transform a sinner’s life.  Forgiveness offered as a pardon for sins and offenses paves the way for “the goodness of God to cause a sinner to repent.

 

If you are here this morning and you stand in need of forgiveness, be bid you come.  If you have offense against someone and would like to repent before God, we bid you come.  If you want God to forgive you and to allow you his grace to begin again, we bid you come.  Jesus died for your sins and he stands ready to forgive you!  Will you come today?

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Repentance that Leads to Reconciliation

“What do you think? A man had two sons; he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today.’ He answered, ‘I will not’; but later he changed his mind and went. The father went to the second and said the same; and he answered, ‘I go, sir’; but he did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said, “The first.” Jesus said to them, “Truly, I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are going into the kingdom of God ahead of you. For John came to you in the way of righteousness and you did not believe him; and even after you saw it, you did not change your minds and believe him.” (Matthew 21:28-32)

Introduction:
A man discussing an argument he had with his wife says “Oh, how I hate it, every time we have an argument, she gets historical.” The friend replied, “You mean hysterical.” “No,” he insisted. “I mean historical. Every time we argue she drags up everything from the past and holds it against me!”

We’ve been discussing the importance of forgiveness all month long; Jesus commands us to forgive others so that we might be forgiven. Jesus says the standard of measure for our discipleship is how we love one another; one cannot love one whom one cannot forgive. Because the Apostle Paul is right, “All have sinned and come short of the glory of God!” Lord, have mercy!

Many reconciliations have broken down because both parties have come prepared to forgive and unprepared to be forgiven. What is the missing ingredient? Repentance. The wife forgave him, but she did not reconcile with him. Without repentance, there can be no reconciliation; without forgiveness repentance is futile, for the pathway to forgiveness is repentance and repentance precludes reconciliation. Thus, repentance plus forgiveness equals reconciliation. And both parties must see their need for repentance in a dispute if forgiveness and reconciliation are to occur.

Move 1:
Repentance was the first message of Jesus the Christ, John the Baptist, Peter, Paul, and Philip, the Evangelist. It was and it is the first message, because without repentance, you cannot be reconciled with God or your neighbor.

Even today repentance remains crucial to forgiveness and reconciliation. If you don’t believe me, listen to what Jesus said in Matthew 7: 21-23: “not everyone who says to me Lord, Lord, will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my father in heaven. On that day, many will say to me, Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many deeds of power in your name? Then I will declare to them, I never knew you; go away from me, you evil doers.”

Listen carefully, undergoing infant baptism and joining a church does not independent of repentance, reconcile you to God nor guarantee you admission into the kingdom of God. Nor does being a good moral person make one right with God; Jesus said, “Marvel not that I say unto you” while talking with Nicodemus, a good righteous person, “you must be born again.” Nicodemus was a good moral person but he was estranged from a relationship with God because of unrepentance.

Move 2:
I apologized; I said I was sorry? Why is that not sufficient? So just what is repentance Pastor? Let us explore this term repentance together.

Repentance has been defined in many ways over the course of the Christian faith. According to Wayne Grudem (1994) Repentance is a heartfelt sorrow for sin, a renouncing of it, and a sincere commitment to forsake it and walk in obedience to Christ. Repentance is something that occurs in the heart and involves the whole person in a decision to turn from sin.

According to Baker’s Dictionary of Theology (1960), repentance from the Greek word “Metanoia” can be said to denote that inward change of mind, affections, convictions and commitment, rooted in the fear of God and sorrow for offenses committed against him, which, when accompanied by faith in Jesus Christ, results in an outward turning from sin to God and his service in all of life.”

For example: Several years ago the Peanuts comic strip had Lucy and Charlie Brown practicing football. Lucy would hold the ball for Charlie’s placekicking and then Charlie would kick the ball. But every time Lucy had ever held the ball for Charlie, he would approach the ball and kick with all his might. At the precise moment of the point of no return, Lucy would pick up the ball and Charlie would kick and his momentum unchecked by the ball, which was not there to kick, would cause him to fall flat on his back.

This comic strip episode opened with Lucy holding the ball, but Charlie Brown would not kick the ball. Lucy begged him to kick the ball. But Charlie Brown said, “Every time I try to kick the ball you remove it and I fall on my back.” They went back and forth for the longest time and finally Lucy broke down in tears and admitted, “Charlie Brown I have been so terrible to you over the years, picking up the football like I have. I have played so many cruel tricks on you, but I’ve seen the error of my ways! I’ve seen the hurt look in your eyes when I’ve deceived you. I’ve been wrong, so wrong. Won’t you give a poor penitent girl another chance?”

Charlie Brown was moved by her display of grief and responded to her, “Of course, I’ll give you another chance.” He stepped back as she held the ball, and he ran. At the last moment, Lucy picked up the ball and Charlie Brown fell flat on his back. Lucy’s last words were, “Recognizing your faults and actually changing your ways are two different things, Charlie Brown!”

Move 3:
Repentance then, is a turning away from one state of mind toward another more appropriate state of mind and acting in line with that new thought. Repentance involves the total person: body, soul, and spirit. Hence, repentance involves three aspects of our being: intellectual, emotional, and volitional.

Jesus illustrates this pattern in Matthew 21:28-32. “What do you think? A man had two sons; he went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work in the vineyard today.’ He answered, ‘I will not’; but later he changed his mind and went. The father went to the second and said the same; and he answered, ‘I go, sir’; but he did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father?” They said, “The first.” Jesus said to them, “Truly, I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are going into the kingdom of God ahead of you. For John came to you in the way of righteousness and you did not believe him; and even after you saw it, you did not change your minds and believe him.”

I believe the first son experienced these three stages of repentance which led to his salvation. First, Repentance is intellectual. It changes the way a person thinks about God and neighbor. This young man acknowledged, who it was that asked him to go to work. He understood that his father had the right to ask him to go to work, and finally he believed it was his duty to do what his father required of him. My brothers and my sisters, when you hear the word of God, and the word of God challenges you to be about your heavenly father’s business; you may initially rebel, and leave God’s Work undone. Yet even though you are not obeying God’s Word, you can still agree that God has the right to ask of you to do his will. This is called intellectual agreement, but this alone will not cause repentance.

Intellectual repentance occurs when one has a change in consciousness. In other words, when you hear the word of God, the Holy Spirit awakens your spiritual consciousness. When your spiritual consciousness is awakened you begin to discern between good and evil. You start to see yourself for who you really are, a sinner in need of salvation. Doing wrong is no longer done without a fight. Galatians 5:17 instructs us “For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other to prevent you from dong what you want.” Therefore, guilt is produced with the aim of convincing one that repentance is in order and necessary to reconcile one’s thinking with that of God or another person.

Second, repentance is emotional. It is preceded by godly sorrow — it moves an individual to grieve, to weep with bitter tears. Second Corinthians 7: 9 to 11, reads “Now I rejoice, not because you were grieved, but because your grief led to repentance; for you felt a godly grief, so that you were not harmed in any way by us. For godly grief produces a repentance that leads to salvation and brings no regret, but worldly grief produces death. For see what earnestness this godly grief has produced in you, what alarm, what longing, what zeal, what punishment! At every point you have proved yourselves guiltless in the matter.”

This young man, after his father left him, after he began to intellectually meditate on what his father had asked of him; after he had concluded that his father had every right to ask him to work in the vineyard; he got up and went about his father’s business. This is a sure sign that this son grieved in his heart that he had not done what his father asked him to do. We see the fruit of his intellectual and emotional repentance by the fact that he went and did what his father asked him to do.

Third, repentance is volitional — it is an act, a decision, of the will. In other words, you have to agree to do the will of God, not because you are embarrassed; not because you got exposed; not because you’re afraid; but because you desire to please God. This young man changed his mind. This young man grieved in his heart that he had sinned against his father. This young man was moved deeply and without any motivation other than to make things right with his father, he got up and did what he was asked to do; and this totally changed his life. It led to his salvation.

Move 4 (Celebration)
This is repentance that leads to reconciliation. When a person is persuaded that they have wronged someone and it effects them emotionally to the point of grieving about it, then they make a conscious decision to not only ask forgiveness but to determine never to commit that egregious act again, that is the kind of repentance that leads to reconciliation.

Beloved, God has opened the door through Jesus Christ for you to repent: to change the way you think about God and God’s care for you. God reconciled the entire world unto himself through the blood of Jesus Christ His Son. You only have to repent and have faith in what God did through Jesus to be reconciled with God.

Yet some people are like the little boy who got his hand stuck in a vase. His parents applied soapy water and cooking oil hoping he would slide his hand through, but to no avail. They tried everything they knew to set the boy’s hands free of the vase. Suddenly, they decided to break that valuable vase because they loved their son just that much.

It was at this point, when they had decided to demonstrate their love by destroying the vase, that the boy asked, “Would it help if I let go of the penny I’m holding?” What are you holding on too that prevents you from reconciling with God today. What offense, what bitterness, what resentment precludes you from a relationship with God through Jesus Christ? Let it go today and return to God.

Now is the time to repent not simply in your mind; but with your emotions, and with your will. Present your entire being to the Lord Jesus Christ, and he will transform you. He will abolish your sins. Acts 3:19 records, “Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord.” He will refresh you. He will renew you. And 2 Corinthians 5:17 declares If any man one be in Christ; He is a new creation, old things have passed away; behold all things have become new. Hallelujah
Will you come and receive forgiveness and reconciliation? Jesus is calling you to act today in concert with the Word of God. Come now!

Settle Your Disputes Quickly

Now I appeal to Euodia and Syntyche. Please, because you belong to the Lord, settle your disagreement. And I ask you, my true partner, to help these two women, for they worked hard with me in telling others the Good News. They worked along with Clement and the rest of my co-workers, whose names are written in the Book of Life. (Philippians 4:2, 3 NLT)

Sandwiched between forgetting the past in his own life and giving us the imperative to “Rejoice in The Lord” is Paul’s plea for reconciliation between two leaders. Euodia and Syntyche had worked together in Paul’s ministry but some conflict separated them.
Satan had caused a rift and Paul was praying for it to be healed.

When two people are effective in ministry, watch for satan to try and destroy their relationship. Beloved be on guard against needless dissension. The Bible says “Iron sharpens iron,” so expect some conflict as you serve Christ, but do not allow it to hinder your mission. Let love prevail over all disputes; reconcile your differences as you continue your mission.